roxanegay:

This morning I was browsing the news as I do every morning and read about the following:

  • The difficulties women have in academia if they choose to have children.
  • Impending abortion legislation in Texas that will leave only 5 abortion clinics open.
  • Nigella Lawson, being choked, in public, by…

bdgrabinski:

BITTER ORANGE. Written and directed by my bro Hope Larson. Starring Brie Larson (no relation), Brendan Hines and James Urbaniak. Watch. Share. Reblog. Whatever.

(Source: bdgrabinski)

A Thought About Action Sequences

I’m absolutely not the first person to voice this opinion, but I think it’s worth repeating anyway.   

 

I’m tired of people saying things like “XYZ Summer Blockbuster had a terrible script, and it wasn’t really that well directed, but the action was incredible!” I’m tired of this for 2 reasons.

 

One, if a movie has a terrible script, part of the terribleness is undoubtedly that the characters are acting in ways that don’t make any sense in terms of the events of the movie or in terms of the way that actual living, breathing human beings act in general. This means that we, the audience, will have a difficult time relating to these characters, understanding them, or caring about them as we’re watching the events of the story unfold. This is a problem, because on top of not understanding why we give a shit about any of these people and what they’re doing onscreen, we also aren’t going to give much of a shit about the action because we ultimately don’t care what’s happening to these characters, regardless if the special effects look pretty or not.

 

Two, if the movie itself isn’t really executed that well—let’s say in this case that the director doesn’t have the best ear for tonal consistency and isn’t very good at demonstrating a sense of geography during action scenes (or maybe even has a poor sense of geography in the typical, map-reading, more-obvious meaning of the word)—we probably don’t even know what’s happening in the action scenes half the time because we aren’t really sure where the characters are supposed to be at any given moment or how they got there in the first place. There’s no through-line, no sense of storytelling within the action scenes, just a lot of moment-to-moment slam-bam-crash filler bullshit, and that, my friends, is not good action. And it’s most definitely not “incredible action.”

 

By the way, I saw Man of Steel last night.  

I started reading this Washington Post piece in the car, while my husband was driving us back home from dinner at a popular ramen spot in Downtown Los Angeles. “You have to read this article about the Newtown families,” I said. But he already knew which article I was talking about; he’d been reading it while we stood outside the restaurant, killing time before our name was called from the waitlist. He hadn’t mentioned it at the time because he didn’t want to get emotional about it. He wanted us to have a nice dinner.

I’m frightened. I’m frightened by our collective ability to be consumed by a tragedy for a short period of time before moving onto the next, forgetting our previous outrage and emotion along the way. I’m frightened by the fact that there was a shooting involving semi-automatic weapons at Santa Monica College yesterday, killing two people, and it barely registered for me. At the time I thought, “Oh, that’s awful.” Then, once the situation seemed to be contained, I went back to reading tweets about “The 20 Wardrobe Essentials You Need For Summer” and “Top 5 Affordable Home Décor Trends.”

I’m a person who adamantly supports gun control. I’ve written emails to my congressional representatives and expressed my anti-gun opinions through voting choices and via social media. I went to graduate school at Virginia Tech, a place still very much affected by the events of April 16, 2007. My mentor and thesis director Lucinda Roy literally wrote the book about the tragedy and ways to enact change. During a Form and Theory of Poetry class I had with Bob Hicok my first semester, he paused to tell us that Seung-Hui Cho had been a student of his in a class that was held in the very room we were sitting in. He pointed to the back corner at the desk where his former student used to sit. There was a shooting at Tech while I was there, a gunman roaming the campus while my professors and colleagues stayed on lockdown, holed up in their offices, avoiding windows. I’d been planning on going into campus early that day to grade papers but accidentally slept in. I learned about what was happening from the warmth and safety of my apartment when my husband, then fiancé, sent me a text asking if I was okay. A campus police officer was shot and killed in front of the health center where I was planning to pick up a prescription.

Four people were killed yesterday in Santa Monica. Another victim is brain dead. It’s been said for a while that we’re becoming desensitized to violent events like these, and, if the general reaction I’ve witnessed on Twitter is any indication, that seems about right. This incident seems barely a blip on the LA radar, let alone the national one. Then there’s my own reaction: I heard about it and went on with my day as usual. Me—a person strongly and vocally in favor of strict gun control. A person who cried while reading this Washington Post piece. I’m at a loss. I’m not sure what else we can do to change what’s happening in our country right now. The tragedies haven’t come and gone.  They’re continuing, each one reaching, bleeding, into the next and ever after. The tragedy in Newtown didn’t just happen on a day last December; it’s still happening, both for these families and for our country, every moment that all this violence and heartache continues to be for nothing. The only thing that’s changed is we feel a little less shock each time. A little less emotion. Less empathy.

That’s really frightening. 

illustratedladies:

audrey malo.

Cool art. 

Tags: art

"I saw (on Twitter) an assertion by no less a person than Joyce Carol Oates that reviews should include a minimum of opinion. I am not sure what all of this means for my ethics or my prospects as a book reviewer. But I’ll say it: It is my opinion that this novel is awful, and I am aesthetically or philosophically opposed to it."

Lydia Kiesling, “Modern Life is Rubbish: Tao Lin’s Taipei (via millionsmillions)

mattfractionblog:

In 2009, Knopf published a version of THE ORIGINAL OF LAURA — a work unfinished at the time of Nabokov’s death — as a series of collated index cards. Designer Chip Kidd created a conceptual masterpiece with this: each page a facsimile index card, perforated to allow the reader to play at editing as Nabokov did; beneath it a transcription. THE ORIGINAL OF LAURA allows you to destroy it; a manuscript about dying and auto-obliteration became an invitation to interact with the experience — by experiencing dying and auto-obliteration via the book itself.  

Fascinating. I might need this. 

(via samhumphries)

thompsonted:

image

This week I turned in the final draft of my book to my publisher. If you know me, or have happened to run into me at CVS on a Tuesday evening with a distant and vaguely stern look on my face, you know that this has been a long time coming. While I generally try to avoid…

Tags: lit writing novel

razorshapes:

Pablo Picasso - Bull (1945)
About Picasso’s series:
“Pablo Picasso created ‘Bull’ around the Christmas of 1945. ‘Bull’ is a suite of eleven lithographs that have become a master class in how to develop an artwork from the academic to the abstract. In this series of images, all pulled from a single stone, Picasso visually dissects the image of a bull to discover its essential presence through a progressive analysis of its form. Each plate is a successive stage in an investigation to find the absolute ‘spirit’ of the beast.”

razorshapes:

Pablo Picasso - Bull (1945)

About Picasso’s series:

“Pablo Picasso created ‘Bull’ around the Christmas of 1945. ‘Bull’ is a suite of eleven lithographs that have become a master class in how to develop an artwork from the academic to the abstract. In this series of images, all pulled from a single stone, Picasso visually dissects the image of a bull to discover its essential presence through a progressive analysis of its form. Each plate is a successive stage in an investigation to find the absolute ‘spirit’ of the beast.”

(via paperdarts)

flavorpill:

Joseph Heller’s chart outline for Catch-22. Check out the full gallery of Famous Authors’ Handwritten Outlines.

Outline inspiration. 

flavorpill:

Joseph Heller’s chart outline for Catch-22. Check out the full gallery of Famous Authors’ Handwritten Outlines.

Outline inspiration. 

(via latimes)